Read if you are ready dive into the world of docker for the first time!

Docker

An application that simplifies the process of managing application processes in containers is Docker. Containers let you run your applications in resource-isolated processes.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to install and use Docker Community Edition (CE) on Ubuntu 18.04.

Requirements:

One Ubuntu 18.04 server set up, including a sudo non-root user and a firewall.

Step 1 — Docker installation:

1. SET UP THE REPOSITORY

First, update your existing list of packages or apt package index:

sudo apt-get update

Install packages to allow apt to use a repository over HTTPS:

sudo apt-get install apt-transport-https ca-certificates curl software-properties-common

Then add the GPG key for the official Docker repository to your system:

curl -fsSL https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu/gpg | sudo apt-key add -

Add the Docker repository to APT sources:

sudo add-apt-repository "deb [arch=amd64] https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu bionic stable"

2. INSTALL DOCKER ENGINE-COMMUNITY

Update the apt package index

sudo apt-get update

Make sure you are about to install from the Docker repo instead of the default Ubuntu repo:

apt-cache policy docker-ce

Install the latest version of Docker Engine - Community and container

sudo apt-get install docker-ce docker-ce-cli containerd.io

Docker should now be installed, the daemon started, and the process enabled to start on boot. Check that it’s running:

sudo systemctl status docker

The output should be similar to the following, showing that the service is active and running:

Output
docker.service - Docker Application Container Engine
   Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/docker.service; enabled; vendor preset: enabled)
   Active: active (running) since Thu 2018-07-05 15:08:39 UTC; 2min 55s ago
     Docs: https://docs.docker.com
 Main PID: 10096 (dockerd)
    Tasks: 16
   CGroup: /system.slice/docker.service
           ├─10096 /usr/bin/dockerd -H fd://
           └─10113 docker-containerd --config /var/run/docker/containerd/containerd.toml

Verify that Docker Engine - Community is installed correctly by running the hello-world image.

sudo docker run hello-world

Step 2 — Executing the Docker Command Without Sudo (Optional)

By default, the docker command can only be run the root user or by a user in the docker group, which is automatically created during Docker’s installation process. If you attempt to run the docker command without prefixing it with sudo or without being in the docker group, you’ll get an output like this:

Outputdocker: Cannot connect to the Docker daemon. Is the docker daemon running on this host?.
See 'docker run --help'.

If you want to avoid typing sudo whenever you run the docker command, add your username to the docker group:

sudo usermod -aG docker ${USER}

To apply the new group membership, log out of the server and back in, or type the following:

su - ${USER}

You will be prompted to enter your user’s password to continue.

Confirm that your user is now added to the docker group by typing:

id -nG
//Output
sammy sudo docker

If you need to add a user to the docker group that you’re not logged in as, declare that username explicitly using:

sudo usermod -aG docker username

The rest of this article assumes you are running the docker command as a user in the docker group. If you choose not to, please prepend the commands with sudo.

Let’s explore the docker command next.

Step 3 — Working with Docker Images

Docker containers are built from Docker images. By default, Docker pulls these images from Docker Hub, a Docker registry managed by Docker, the company behind the Docker project. Anyone can host their Docker images on Docker Hub, so most applications and Linux distributions you’ll need will have images hosted there.

To check whether you can access and download images from Docker Hub, type:

docker run hello-world

The output will indicate that Docker in working correctly:

OutputUnable to find image 'hello-world:latest' locally
latest: Pulling from library/hello-world
9bb5a5d4561a: Pull complete
Digest: sha256:3e1764d0f546ceac4565547df2ac4907fe46f007ea229fd7ef2718514bcec35d
Status: Downloaded newer image for hello-world:latest

Hello from Docker!
This message shows that your installation appears to be working correctly.
...

Docker was initially unable to find the hello-world image locally, so it downloaded the image from Docker Hub, which is the default repository. Once the image downloaded, Docker created a container from the image and the application within the container executed, displaying the message.

You can search for images available on Docker Hub by using the docker command with the search subcommand. For example, to search for the Ubuntu image, type:

docker search ubuntu

Execute the following command to download the official ubuntu image to your computer:

docker pull ubuntu

You’ll see the following output:

OutputUsing default tag: latest
latest: Pulling from library/ubuntu
6b98dfc16071: Pull complete
4001a1209541: Pull complete
6319fc68c576: Pull complete
b24603670dc3: Pull complete
97f170c87c6f: Pull complete
Digest: sha256:5f4bdc3467537cbbe563e80db2c3ec95d548a9145d64453b06939c4592d67b6d
Status: Downloaded newer image for ubuntu:latest

After an image has been downloaded, you can then run a container using the downloaded image with the run subcommand. As you saw with the hello-world example, if an image has not been downloaded when docker is executed with the run subcommand, the Docker client will first download the image, then run a container using it.

To see the images that have been downloaded to your computer, type:

docker images

The output should look similar to the following:

OutputREPOSITORY          TAG                 IMAGE ID            CREATED             SIZE
ubuntu              latest              113a43faa138        4 weeks ago         81.2MB
hello-world         latest              e38bc07ac18e        2 months ago        1.85kB

As you’ll see later in this tutorial, images that you use to run containers can be modified and used to generate new images, which may then be uploaded (pushed is the technical term) to Docker Hub or other Docker registries.

Step 4 — Managing Docker Containers

To view all containers — active and inactive, run docker ps with the -a switch:

docker ps -a

You’ll see output similar to this:

d9b100f2f636        ubuntu              "/bin/bash"         About an hour ago   Exited (0) 8 minutes ago                           sharp_volhard
01c950718166        hello-world         "/hello"            About an hour ago   Exited (0) About an hour ago                       festive_williams

Conclusion

Well done! In this tutorial, you have installed Docker and learnt about Docker images.

Get Quote

We're here to help and answer any question you might have.
We look forward to hear from you. 🙂

You've successfully subscribed to Probyto | The Data Science Company
Welcome back! You've successfully signed in.
Great! You've successfully signed up.
Success! Your account is fully activated, you now have access to all content.